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Old 09-10-2004, 08:40 PM
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Fatality on the Island of Sal

A beginner kiteboarder from Italy launched a 9 m LEI kite to ride off of Ponta Preta at the SW coast of the island of Sal in Cabo Verde in early February 2004. Cabo Verde is a group of 10 islands located approximately 400 miles to the west of Senegal in NW Africa.


From: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/afr...es/1021202.stm


From: http://www.caboverde.com/ilhas/ysal-it.htm

Winds were side offshore at about 20 kts. with ground swells forming about 50 m (170 ft.) or less from the rocky shoreline at heights ranging from 3 to 4 m (10 to 13 ft.). Ponta Preta is widely known as a demanding, advanced riding location.


From: http://www.surf4all.net/surf-lire-board-e-2764.html

The rider reportedly fell over in a wave and was swept into the rocks. He was not wearing a helmet or impact vest. His back was seriously injured although to what degree it is unknown at this time. It is not known what other injuries the rider sustained from this impact. The accident was stated to have occurred at about 4 pm and the rider was flown off the island at about 6 pm as medical care is quite limited on the island. The rider died during the flight of unknown causes. If additional information is available about this accident, please contact me by private email at <flkitesurfer@hotmail.com>

Additional information appears at:

http://www.flysurf.com/frontblocks/n...BB_LANGUAGES=2

http://www.kiteforum.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=2299990

Ponta Preta, given large powerful groundswells, the short distance to a rocky shoreline and side off winds is a technical launch and potentially hazardous riding area. It has been described in various online sites as a pro to advanced kiteboarding area only. This is no spot for any one other than strong riders and given the reported level of experience of the rider he should not have launched at this location. Given the power and speed of 3 to 4 m ground swells and less than 50 m to the rocks, a rider could wipeout and slam into the rocks quite rapidly. I understand that there are beginner and intermediate spots off the NW coast of the island of Sal with side onshore winds and more manageable wave conditions. The person that I spoke to on the island indicated that insufficiently experienced kiteboarders wanting to ride off this world famous area is a problem. There is no one to just stand around to quiz and potentially warn off kiteboarders from this wave spot. It is up to visiting kiteboarders to research local conditions, ask for advice and critically to take prudent advice that they are given. This applies to riders visiting ANY area. It is not known if the riders injuries would have been lessened or not by use of a helmet and impact vest. Even pros and advanced riders can get into problems at a launch like this. Still with advanced ability they may be able to come out of things with lesser injury and if not at least they have enough experience to accept the possible consequences.


From: http://hanglos.nl/asp/news/shownews.asp?ArtCode=4493

Manu Bertin shown riding big surf off of Ponta Preta. It is beautiful to watch. Manu was one of the first kiteboarders on Maui back in the mid 1990s. I imagine he rode off of Hookipa and perhaps even Jaws which the above images resemble. Still, Manu is a world class rider and is thoroughly familiar with big wave riding and no doubt the consequences of hitting the nearby rocky shore at speed. This sport is incredible but have a care to ride within your abilities. A big part of that is researching launches at destinations you are going to visit, asking experienced locals for advice and following prudent advice that is given. There are other wave riding spots around the world, often with shallow rocky bottoms and iron rocky shores nearby. Mokes in Oahu with rocky nearshore conditions claimed a rider a couple of years ago. That rider was very experienced but things just didn't work out that day.

More at: http://www.kiteforum.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=2300037

Originally posted at:

http://www.kiteforum.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=2300077


COPYRIGHT 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 FKA, INC.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
__________________
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transcribed by:
Rick Iossi
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  #2  
Old 09-10-2004, 08:40 PM
RickI's Avatar
RickI RickI is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2004
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Default Expanded KSI Accounts 2

Fatality on the Island of Sal

A beginner kiteboarder from Italy launched a 9 m LEI kite to ride off of Ponta Preta at the SW coast of the island of Sal in Cabo Verde in early February 2004. Cabo Verde is a group of 10 islands located approximately 400 miles to the west of Senegal in NW Africa.


From: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/afr...es/1021202.stm


From: http://www.caboverde.com/ilhas/ysal-it.htm

Winds were side offshore at about 20 kts. with ground swells forming about 50 m (170 ft.) or less from the rocky shoreline at heights ranging from 3 to 4 m (10 to 13 ft.). Ponta Preta is widely known as a demanding, advanced riding location.


From: http://www.surf4all.net/surf-lire-board-e-2764.html

The rider reportedly fell over in a wave and was swept into the rocks. He was not wearing a helmet or impact vest. His back was seriously injured although to what degree it is unknown at this time. It is not known what other injuries the rider sustained from this impact. The accident was stated to have occurred at about 4 pm and the rider was flown off the island at about 6 pm as medical care is quite limited on the island. The rider died during the flight of unknown causes. If additional information is available about this accident, please contact me by private email at <flkitesurfer@hotmail.com>

Additional information appears at:

http://www.flysurf.com/frontblocks/n...BB_LANGUAGES=2

http://www.kiteforum.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=2299990

Ponta Preta, given large powerful groundswells, the short distance to a rocky shoreline and side off winds is a technical launch and potentially hazardous riding area. It has been described in various online sites as a pro to advanced kiteboarding area only. This is no spot for any one other than strong riders and given the reported level of experience of the rider he should not have launched at this location. Given the power and speed of 3 to 4 m ground swells and less than 50 m to the rocks, a rider could wipeout and slam into the rocks quite rapidly. I understand that there are beginner and intermediate spots off the NW coast of the island of Sal with side onshore winds and more manageable wave conditions. The person that I spoke to on the island indicated that insufficiently experienced kiteboarders wanting to ride off this world famous area is a problem. There is no one to just stand around to quiz and potentially warn off kiteboarders from this wave spot. It is up to visiting kiteboarders to research local conditions, ask for advice and critically to take prudent advice that they are given. This applies to riders visiting ANY area. It is not known if the riders injuries would have been lessened or not by use of a helmet and impact vest. Even pros and advanced riders can get into problems at a launch like this. Still with advanced ability they may be able to come out of things with lesser injury and if not at least they have enough experience to accept the possible consequences.


From: http://hanglos.nl/asp/news/shownews.asp?ArtCode=4493

Manu Bertin shown riding big surf off of Ponta Preta. It is beautiful to watch. Manu was one of the first kiteboarders on Maui back in the mid 1990s. I imagine he rode off of Hookipa and perhaps even Jaws which the above images resemble. Still, Manu is a world class rider and is thoroughly familiar with big wave riding and no doubt the consequences of hitting the nearby rocky shore at speed. This sport is incredible but have a care to ride within your abilities. A big part of that is researching launches at destinations you are going to visit, asking experienced locals for advice and following prudent advice that is given. There are other wave riding spots around the world, often with shallow rocky bottoms and iron rocky shores nearby. Mokes in Oahu with rocky nearshore conditions claimed a rider a couple of years ago. That rider was very experienced but things just didn't work out that day.

More at: http://www.kiteforum.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=2300037

Originally posted at:

http://www.kiteforum.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=2300077


COPYRIGHT 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 FKA, INC.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
__________________
FKA, Inc.

transcribed by:
Rick Iossi
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-10-2004, 08:42 PM
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RickI RickI is offline
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Location: Florida
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Default Fatality in Tasmania

My sincere condolences go out to the family and friends of this man and to all riders Downunder in this sad time. The Australian Kitesurfing Association (AKSA), has provided information from their investigation of the tragic fatal kiteboarding accident in Tasmania that happened on December 1, 2003. A summary of that information follows:

The accident involved a kiteboarder of just under three years experience who had come into the sport from windsurfing and possessed a true love for the sport. The rider was in a hurry to launch and get some riding in after work in the area of Hobart along the southeast coast of Tasmania. Tasmania is an island south of the southeast corner of Australia.
http://www.tas.gov.au/images/tasmap-600.gif

The rider was to fly a 12 m 2003 Cabrinha kite in onshore & shifting 16-18 knots gusting to 24 to 25 knots. Although conditions were reportedly gustier than normal no squalls were present. It was near high tide and a close female friend helped him to launch his kite in the onshore winds while both were standing on land. The kite stalled and fell/flew downwind into low bushes next to some tall pine trees with the kite’s leading edge facing upward. The kite may have been launched a bit closer to 90 degrees off the wind and/or been hit by a pronounced lull causing the kite to stall and drift downwind. The rider was hooked in to his QR equipped chicken loop. The kiteboarder decided to try to do an unassisted relaunch from this position with the kite almost dead downwind in a “hot” launching position WHILE still hooked in. He was hit by a strong gust of shifting wind immediately after he relaunched the kite. The rider was standing only about 10 m (33 ft.) away from rip rap boulders placed along the shoreline for erosion control. He was immediately lofted head first at speed into the rip rap boulders following his hooked in “hot” launch propelled by the strong wind gust. He was immediately knocked unconscious and his kite continued to fly fast, powered up kite loops. Bystanders ran up and managed to depower the kite. The kiteboarder died from his head injuries at the accident scene. He was not wearing a helmet.

I would like to thank Steve McCormack, Asst. Secretary for the AKSA for all his help in providing information for this account. If there are corrections or omitted information please notify me via private email to flkitesurfer@hotmail.com


Several important points come from this accident summary. The sad fact is that today, all too MANY riders might well make many of the same mistakes as this rider. This sport is often seems to be too easy, dangerously easy. When things don’t go wrong very often despite routine careless practices, we often take ready kite control for granted and ignore the tremendous power of the kite in gusts and blinding speed at which things can go seriously wrong. If you visit many launches you will see poor practices quite commonly but things may be improving in this regard all be it slowly. Careless practices erode what factor of safety we may have against misfortune and can remove options for avoiding injury if misfortune strikes.

Some conclusions from this accident follow:

1.Never launch close to and upwind from hard objects.

Avoid downwind “hot” launch and particularly under such poor conditions. “Hot” launches routinely result in the rider being dragged sometimes violently if his by a gust. There was no significant buffer distance between the rider and the boulders. He must have covered the distance in seconds and had no time whatsoever for any effective reaction once things were in motion. If you have the option, walk out into the water to launch to improve your buffer zone.

2.Avoid onshore winds.

Onshore winds are responsible for an excessive quantity of accidents and injuries to riders ranging from new to very experienced. Drive a bit further to a safer launch area with side shore or side onshore winds, it is worth your time.

3.Work on “unhooked” launches and landings.

This rider might have avoided injury even if he made the dangerous choice to do a “hot” launch conditions under such very poor conditions IF he had unhooked first.

4.Make sure that your kite is “biting” into the air or is ready to take off before instructing your assistant to release the kite.

If the kite is sluggish, wait for the wind to fill in and verify that you are no more than 90 degrees off the wind in moderate conditions and slightly more in light conditions.

5.If your kite doesn’t appear to be properly launching IMMEDIATELY depower your kite.

All it takes is a gust with the kite downwind to loft and/or drag the kiter potentially resulting in injury even with impact against sand in some cases. If your kite doesn’t do what you originally expected or WHEN IN DOUBT … PUNCH OUT, immediately! If things truly go wrong and you hesitate you may remove any “out” or escape from serious injury.

6.If you have a trained assistant, USE him to assist you.

If the unexpected happens, have your assist help you to setup and relaunch again without trying to do a hot downwind launch or to fix things on your own. Solo launches are generally more hazardous than proper assisted launches.

7.ALWAYS WEAR A COMFORTABLE HELMET APPROPRIATE FOR KITEBOARDING.

And still other points.

* Be careful out there.

* Safety starts with becoming aware of the possible hazards AND means of avoiding them.

* Significantly reducing the odds of serious injury is relatively easy to do.

* By contrast successfully dealing with an explosive dragging or lofting to a nearby impact is often infeasible to virtually impossible. The ONLY cure in such rapid accidents may be in the prevention.

Originally posted at:

http://www.kiteforum.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=2297801
__________________
FKA, Inc.

transcribed by:
Rick Iossi
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-10-2004, 08:42 PM
RickI's Avatar
RickI RickI is offline
Administrator
Site Admin
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Florida
Posts: 8,676
Default Fatality in Tasmania

My sincere condolences go out to the family and friends of this man and to all riders Downunder in this sad time. The Australian Kitesurfing Association (AKSA), has provided information from their investigation of the tragic fatal kiteboarding accident in Tasmania that happened on December 1, 2003. A summary of that information follows:

The accident involved a kiteboarder of just under three years experience who had come into the sport from windsurfing and possessed a true love for the sport. The rider was in a hurry to launch and get some riding in after work in the area of Hobart along the southeast coast of Tasmania. Tasmania is an island south of the southeast corner of Australia.
http://www.tas.gov.au/images/tasmap-600.gif

The rider was to fly a 12 m 2003 Cabrinha kite in onshore & shifting 16-18 knots gusting to 24 to 25 knots. Although conditions were reportedly gustier than normal no squalls were present. It was near high tide and a close female friend helped him to launch his kite in the onshore winds while both were standing on land. The kite stalled and fell/flew downwind into low bushes next to some tall pine trees with the kite’s leading edge facing upward. The kite may have been launched a bit closer to 90 degrees off the wind and/or been hit by a pronounced lull causing the kite to stall and drift downwind. The rider was hooked in to his QR equipped chicken loop. The kiteboarder decided to try to do an unassisted relaunch from this position with the kite almost dead downwind in a “hot” launching position WHILE still hooked in. He was hit by a strong gust of shifting wind immediately after he relaunched the kite. The rider was standing only about 10 m (33 ft.) away from rip rap boulders placed along the shoreline for erosion control. He was immediately lofted head first at speed into the rip rap boulders following his hooked in “hot” launch propelled by the strong wind gust. He was immediately knocked unconscious and his kite continued to fly fast, powered up kite loops. Bystanders ran up and managed to depower the kite. The kiteboarder died from his head injuries at the accident scene. He was not wearing a helmet.

I would like to thank Steve McCormack, Asst. Secretary for the AKSA for all his help in providing information for this account. If there are corrections or omitted information please notify me via private email to flkitesurfer@hotmail.com


Several important points come from this accident summary. The sad fact is that today, all too MANY riders might well make many of the same mistakes as this rider. This sport is often seems to be too easy, dangerously easy. When things don’t go wrong very often despite routine careless practices, we often take ready kite control for granted and ignore the tremendous power of the kite in gusts and blinding speed at which things can go seriously wrong. If you visit many launches you will see poor practices quite commonly but things may be improving in this regard all be it slowly. Careless practices erode what factor of safety we may have against misfortune and can remove options for avoiding injury if misfortune strikes.

Some conclusions from this accident follow:

1.Never launch close to and upwind from hard objects.

Avoid downwind “hot” launch and particularly under such poor conditions. “Hot” launches routinely result in the rider being dragged sometimes violently if his by a gust. There was no significant buffer distance between the rider and the boulders. He must have covered the distance in seconds and had no time whatsoever for any effective reaction once things were in motion. If you have the option, walk out into the water to launch to improve your buffer zone.

2.Avoid onshore winds.

Onshore winds are responsible for an excessive quantity of accidents and injuries to riders ranging from new to very experienced. Drive a bit further to a safer launch area with side shore or side onshore winds, it is worth your time.

3.Work on “unhooked” launches and landings.

This rider might have avoided injury even if he made the dangerous choice to do a “hot” launch conditions under such very poor conditions IF he had unhooked first.

4.Make sure that your kite is “biting” into the air or is ready to take off before instructing your assistant to release the kite.

If the kite is sluggish, wait for the wind to fill in and verify that you are no more than 90 degrees off the wind in moderate conditions and slightly more in light conditions.

5.If your kite doesn’t appear to be properly launching IMMEDIATELY depower your kite.

All it takes is a gust with the kite downwind to loft and/or drag the kiter potentially resulting in injury even with impact against sand in some cases. If your kite doesn’t do what you originally expected or WHEN IN DOUBT … PUNCH OUT, immediately! If things truly go wrong and you hesitate you may remove any “out” or escape from serious injury.

6.If you have a trained assistant, USE him to assist you.

If the unexpected happens, have your assist help you to setup and relaunch again without trying to do a hot downwind launch or to fix things on your own. Solo launches are generally more hazardous than proper assisted launches.

7.ALWAYS WEAR A COMFORTABLE HELMET APPROPRIATE FOR KITEBOARDING.

And still other points.

* Be careful out there.

* Safety starts with becoming aware of the possible hazards AND means of avoiding them.

* Significantly reducing the odds of serious injury is relatively easy to do.

* By contrast successfully dealing with an explosive dragging or lofting to a nearby impact is often infeasible to virtually impossible. The ONLY cure in such rapid accidents may be in the prevention.

Originally posted at:

http://www.kiteforum.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=2297801
__________________
FKA, Inc.

transcribed by:
Rick Iossi
Reply With Quote
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